Monthly Archives: March 2014

Articles! Where are the articles?! 

I was educated in the US school system since third grade. Back in the day when I moved to the US, to my knowledge, there was no Japanese school available. On Saturdays, the embassy rented out a couple of classrooms from a private school in the area to hold Hoshuukou, or Saturday school offering the regular Japanese school curriculum to expat students. So my regular week was a six-day week, the first five in a regular public school and Saturday was devoted to my Japanese studies. This was in a time before sushi was a popular food, kids still believed that, in Japan, we all wore kimonos and Japanese people can all do Karate and are Ninjas. I’m not exaggerating, kids used to ask me this shit all the time. My bento box was looked down upon as “weird stinky food.” When my gym teacher realized I didn’t understand the rules for American football (and I still don’t), she sent over the other Asian girl to me to translate for me. She was Chinese, I think. I still remember the shame I felt, as I stood in the corner and this girl shyly came over to me as the whole class watched. She tried to explain the American football rules in English. The teacher ushered her saying, “No no, in Chinese…she doesn’t speak English.” She tried to explain I didn’t know Chinese either, but she was told, “Well, it’s similar isn’t it?” She shrugged her shoulders, knowing that she wasn’t going to convince them otherwise, and tried her best to communicate with me.

People weren’t bad, many of the kids were really nice, they tried to include me in their games. After figuring out that I did not have a basic understanding of English, the school took the initiative and moved me to the ESL (English Speaking and Learning) class. For half the day, I sat there with a coloring paper the teacher gave me and only participated in math class. We non-native speakers spent the other half of the day in a different classroom where we “learned” English. In reality, I spent about three years spelling out the days of the week. Being Japanese, my pronunciation of “Th” was not perfect and the teachers decided that I was not fit to return to regular classes. So you can say, I lost a good amount of primary school education.

It also meant that I didn’t have the chance to study the basics of English grammar. It took me several years to develop enough English from regular classes to finally be able to speak, and eventually write. Neither really happened until my mother, realizing I was getting nowhere in the public school ESL class, moved me to an academic private school where the teachers made a significant effort to make sure I could keep up with the rest of the class.

Articles and tense agreement have remained a challenge for me since Japanese does not have either. I’ve also come to realize that most educated people are pretty iffy on articles. If I was to choose 10 equally well-educated people to proofread, I would get several different opinions on my use of articles. That’s just amongst Americans, add in some British and Australians and I’m sure I would get totally different comments from everyone in the room.
**Marc says I need a semi-colon or a period after “Americans”, and he’s calling it a gut feeling. Case and point**

Apparently though, I’ve left my articles in the US. Since moving to Singapore, I’ve noticed I’m losing my articles. Chinese, like Japanese, does not have the concept of articles and even English speakers here tend to drop them. I have to be very careful when I write because Marc looks at me and goes “What’s missing here?” and I would sheepishly have to admit, “the”. I’ve noticed Nina’s English lacks many articles as she’s learning how to speak in Singapore. Now, how do you insert articles back into your life? This is going to be a long battle….

** The articles in color are the ones I was originally missing that Marc added in for me**

I plan on writing about this topic in Japanese separately in a bit.

Onigiri? Onigiri! /おにぎり? え?

Having a multicultural family always has its own challenges, especially when your partner does not share the same level of interest for your culture. Luckily, Marc has always been interested in Japanese culture and he has always supported me in raising our children in a mixed cultural environment. We’ve had our FAIL moments though…

Before we had children, before we were even married, we were busy New Yorkers living THE life in an East Village studio. I was a consultant at the time and had crazy hours. Calls at 10PM, working all-nighters…took me a while to realize it didn’t have to be that way.

Anyways, one of those nights, I’ve had enough and left work at around 9PM and called Marc hoping to see his face for once before crashing.

“Hey….”
“Hey, had a rough day?”
“Yup, leaving now, should be back in about half an hour”
“Want anything when you get home?”
“…..I wish I had an onigiri or something… need soul food…. no, don’t worry about it…. just tired and blabbering…”
“OK, well, get home soon, we can chat later”

We hung up the phone and I dragged my butt home. When I opened the door, Marc welcomed me with a full smile and led me to the kitchen.

“Here!”
“huh?”
“Onigiri!”
“Um…..wow….Thanks(?)”

If you’ve seen a property made onigiri, it looks like this.
What I saw on the big dinner plate were 3 white oums (from the Nausicaa of the Valley of Wind).

…What? I wanted to ask him how a simple rice ball turned into large grubs, but seeing his proud face, I couldn’t do it. I did appreciate his effort, I just didn’t know what to say. I smiled, said thank you in the most sincere way I could and managed to use both hands to pick up one of the gigantic grubs.

“OK, shape is funny, a bit gruesome even, but it’s just rice. He made such an effort to cheer me up, I have to eat this,” I said in my mind.

First few bites, it was OK, it tasted like rice. Plain old rice. Fair enough. Then I bit into the middle and choked. I heard a large crunch in the middle and insanely salty blast hit my mouth.

Marc saw the shock on my face and said, “Oh no, are you OK? Did I do something wrong?”

I couldn’t contain it anymore. I burst out in hysterical laughter. I looked at the “onigiri” and saw that he had stuffed furikake, or Japanese salty rice sprinkles in a hole.

“Dude, I’m sorry, but what is this!?”

Marc explained, he couldn’t get the shape right ‘cause his fingers are shaped funny and he remembered the onigiri that we bought at convenience stores had stuffing in it. He couldn’t find the usual tuna or ume (pickled plum), he remembered I used the furikake with onigiri before, so he used it.

“How did you even get that in there!? Furikake is supposed to be mixed into the rice before you make the onigiri.”
“Well, I wasn’t sure how to do it either, so I tried to make the shape, and when I couldn’t do it, I figured I’d poke a hole in it with my finger, used a spoon to pour furikake in there and sealed it with rice.”
“This is terrible…how many cups of rice is it anyways?”
“3?”
“Was I supposed to eat 3 cups of rice in one sitting?”
“Figured you could, you’re a bottomless pit…maybe you didn’t have lunch? ”

We both laughed. At that point we had already been living together for number of years, he’d seen me make onigiri so many times, but we realized when something is not a part of your culture, even years of being together, we still sometimes need to rehash it together and make sure what we think we know, is actually right.

Man, he tried, and he tried REALLY hard, but to this day, it’s the worst looking and tasting onigiri in the history of onigiri. Later, we took an onigiri class (Yes. They had such a thing in NYC) and he has since just learned to use saran wrap. Now, he makes them for Nina and Mila all the time and even taught Nina how to make them herself.

See girls, daddy wasn’t always perfect. It took some work to get him there!

文化の違う人と暮らすのって、難しいんではないか、外国人と結婚した人に良く聞かれるしてもんです。個人的には常識なんて、家庭レベルで違うものだし、結局は誰とやっていくにも努力が必用で、普通のそう違うもんでもないと思ってるんですが。たまにありえないすれ違いがあるのも事実。うちでも若い頃はありました。

ニューヨークのイーストビレッジで同居してた頃、私達は二人ともニューヨークの仕事人生を謳歌。私はその時コンサルタントで、徹夜もあり、とにかく不規則な、ま、今振り返ると、何であんなに必死だったんだろう、と思うような生活でした。

ある夜9時頃、いい加減いやになって、もう今日は切り上げて帰ろう、とマークに電話。

”へイ”
”へイ、今夜も疲れてるね、帰ってこれるの”
”うん、今帰る、30分くらいかな”
”何か食べたいものとかは?”
”うん、疲れた、おにぎりとかちょっとほっとするもん食べたい…何でもない…疲れてるだけ、いいや、寝る”
”そっか、じゃ、早く帰っておいで。”

電話を切ってフラフラしながら帰宅すると、マークが満面の笑みでお出迎え。キッチンから誇らしげにお皿を出してきた。

”どうぞ!”
”へ?”
”おにぎり!”
”え?…あの…あ、ありがと”

お皿の上には、おにぎりとは似ても似つかぬ巨大な白い王蟲(あのナウシカに出てくる奴ね)もどきがで~ん、と3匹乗っていた。何でこうなったのか聞きたくてしょうがなかったけど、誇らしげにしてる顔を見ると、そうもいえず、精一杯のありがとうを言って、一口。

(心の声)”何だ、この結構やばい形は。ってか、でかいよ。でも、折角頑張って、癒そうとしてくれてるのに断れん。ま、お米だよ、大丈夫だよ、みてくれあれだけど、ここで食べないのは失礼だって…”

最初の二口三口はただのお米。塩味もしない、ま、ご飯そのもの。そりゃそうか、でもこの大きさ、両手で精いっぱいだけど、と食べ進む。が、3口目、じょりっっっという変な音と、もんのすごい塩っ辛さがど~ん、と来た。流石にむせるし、びっくりするし、

マークもびっくりして、”どうした、何か間違えた!?”

もうこの時点で私も壊れた。大爆笑。覗いてみると、王蟲ちゃんの中にはふりかけがギッシリ詰められてた。

”いや、何がおかしいって、何で?この形どうしたの?何が入ってんのこれ?ってかどうやって入れたの?ふりかけってご飯に混ぜてからおにぎりにするでしょ”

マークは、一瞬ポカンとして、指が長すぎて形が上手くいかなくて、普段コンビニで買ってるおにぎりには中身があるから、せめてそれだけでもと思ったけど、梅もツナ缶もなくて、悩んでたら前にみゆきがふりかけ使ってるのを思い出したんだけど、どうやってたかがはっきりしないから、一応形になったところで指で穴開けて、そこにふりかけをスプーンで流しいれて、お米で蓋(!?)をした、としどろもどろ。

”これ大きくない?お米何カップ使ったの?”
”3?”
”そんなに食べられないよ”
”だって、普段凄く食べるし…もしかしてお昼たべてないかもと思って…”

この時点ではもう会話にもなってなくて、二人共大笑い。もう何年も一緒に住んで、おにぎり作ってるところなんて何度も見てるし、ふりかけだって分かってるもんだと思ってたのに、文化の違いって、分かってるって思っちゃいけないんだね、ちゃんと会話して、確認しなくちゃね~、と笑いあい。

疲れてた私の為にけなげに頑張ってくれたのはわかるんだけど、ありえないすれ違いにびっくり。おにぎりの歴史上、一番変な形で不味いしろものだったと断言できる。おにぎりって不味く出来るんだ…気持ちはありがたいし、そこまでしてくれるのって幸せな事なんだけど、いや~、あれはひどかった。

その後、ニューヨークでおにぎり教室にわざわざ通い、今ではサランラップでおにぎりを作る技もマスターし、子供達の為にせっせとおにぎりをつくってやり、新菜にちゃんと作り方まで教えられる程になったマーク。

でも、最初からそうではなかったのだよ、子供達。毎日の積み重ねで今のダディがいるのだよ。感謝してくれ。その実験台になったのは、ママなのだ。

雛祭り Japanese Holiday(Girl’s Day)

When you are living in and with three different cultures, you have as three times as many holidays to cover. I end up missing a lot of them, but the one I missed last year and wanted to make up for this year was the Japanese Hinamatsuri or Girls’ Day. In Japan, celebrate the health and happiness of girls on March 3rd. (Don’t worry, we have Boys’ Day on May 5th) We had couple of girls (+ one boy) come over for a small party to celebrate the holiday.

For Hinamatsuri, Japanese families often celebrate by displaying lavish dolls representing a wedding in the Heian period. The dolls often get passed down for generations. We have the dolls my grandfather bought for our mother long time ago. Alas, we cannot bring the dolls to Singapore since we’re afraid of mold, so we decided to do simple arts & crafts and make the dolls ourselves. We displayed the dolls, had the girls day feast and finished with daddy writing each kid’s name with pancake batter on a pan. This is one of my favorite rainy day and party activity. Some food coloring involved, but it’s something different and fun.

Lots of sweets and sugar that day but the girls + 1 boy loved it. We pinked up our apartment for girls day with pink paper, fake flowers on the mirror and pink lanterns hanging on the ceiling. Nina enjoyed the party, so it was well worth it. Mila crashed pretty early that day. I consider that a success.

We had few bottles of champagne and some beer for the parents. My sister had brought Rose sparkling wine. Perfect for the occasion!

やってまいりましたひな祭り。色んな文化ごちゃ混ぜで生活していると、その分祝日も増えるわけで、怠慢な私は結構祝日をスキップしちゃうんですが(旧正月に気をとられて節分忘れてたりとか)ひな祭りは去年忘れてて、今年こそは、と思ってたので、うちでパーティーしました。

お雛様は実家に置きっぱなし、シンガポールに持ってきたらかびそうで、怖くて持ってこられません(涙)そこでとりあえず家中をピンクで飾りたてて、子供達に自分でお雛様を作ってもらってそれを飾りました。ひな祭りのご馳走もそれなりに。プラスパパによるホットケーキのお絵かき余興で締め。これ食紅とかをホットケーキの素に混ぜて、ホットプレートで名前を描いたり、動物描いたりするアクティビティなんですが、子供が喜びます。ちょっとドクドクしい色になってしまう事もあるけど、たまにだからいいよね。

娘とお友達はおかしをいっぱい食べて上機嫌。でも寝かせるのに苦労したとい言う話も…夜遅く(730ゴロ? 普段なら寝る時間…)にホットケーキ食べたりしたからね。親sはシャンパンとビールでほっこり。妹がたまたまロゼのスパークリングワインを持ってきてくれてたので、エンジョイさせて頂きました。次はどの祝日やろうかな~。

ガールズとひなあられ Girls and the Hina arare

ガールズとひなあられ
Girls and the Hina arare

Chirashi Sushi cake  チラシケーキ

Chirashi Sushi cake
チラシケーキ

シャンパンがちょっと写ってる~。 Champagne in front of the kiddies

シャンパンがちょっと写ってる~。
Champagne in front of the kiddies

Everything as indeed pink.  ...note the little boy is not even in the photos....  He was hiding until the dad's showed up

Everything as indeed pink.
…note the little boy is not even in the photos….
He was hiding until the dad’s showed up

Getting Medical Attention in Bali (Safely) バリの病院設備について

Here’s some good information on Medical facilities in Bali. Rough Japanese translation to follow.

妹のブログからのReblogです。二度バリに行って二度共病院のお世話になる不運な彼女の貴重な病院経験を日本語訳(ラフにね、喋りながら)させて貰いました。私はバリには三度行ってるんですが、病院に行った事はありません。でも初めて2004年ゴロに行った時よりもずっと汚くなってしまっているのはとても悲しいです。私の友人もバリに行って、お腹を壊した、病気になったという人が絶えません。無事帰って来てくれて良かった~。

以下抜粋

バリの医療施設

バリには二度行きました。とても楽しい旅でしたが、ザンネンながら二度とも病院にお世話になるはめに…

要約:
BROSホスピタルにER(救急)と診察両方で行く機会がありましたが、どちらの時も大変いい治療を受ける事が出来ました。お勧めです。

Bali Clinicは小さい事(軽い腹痛、熱等)には対応出来るかもしれませんが、専門的な事や重体の場合は、病院に行かれた方がいいとお思います。リゾートやホテルと提携しているところも多く、旅行者は良くこちらに回されるようですが、余りお勧めできません。

詳細:

初めてバリにいった時(去年のクリスマス)Brad(妹の旦那)が食中毒を起こしたため、病院に連れて行くことに。ただ、かなり重度だったので、小さいクリニックではなく、ビラのオーナーさん(バリ在住)にどこに行くべきか聞くことに。彼女のお勧めは、旅行者慣れしていて、オーストラリアからの旅行者に人気なBIMCではなく、デンパサールにあるBROS病院(Bali Royal Hospitalの略)でした。どちらも私達がいたSanurからはそれほど変わらない距離だったので、お勧めのBROS病院へ向かう事を決めました。

緊急病棟にまず向かい、点滴を受けて一応落ち着いたところで、一晩入院。一人部屋には付き添い用の休憩部屋(無料ドリンク等有)、スペアベッド、プライベートのシャワーとお手洗い、エアコン完備、と中級ホテルクラス。アメリカの病院より快適でした。
もちろん現地の方々も利用されている病院ですが、外国人向けの整形ツアー、または他のメディカルツーリズムも行っているらしく、外国人慣れしています。BROSで会ったお医者さんは全員英語は堪能でした。看護婦さんの中には英語に余り慣れていない方もいらっしゃいましたが、基本的な言葉は通じますし、必要な場合はすぐに英語の出来る人を見つけて来てくれたので不都合は感じませんでした。ただ、日本語の出来る方はすくないかもしれません。ただ、Wi-fiは私がバリで体験したなかではぴか一だったので、インターネットを頼りにする事も出来るでしょう。パスワードを最初にチェックインした時に聞いておくと、後々便利です。
次の日も念のため、入院を勧められましたが、症状も改善していたので、退院しました。その後に問題はありませんでした。
一泊入院したにも関わらず、保険抜きでUSD700(現時点で7万ちょい)でした。

2月にバリに友人と戻ったのですが、ビーチで数時間寛いだ後、部屋にもどってみると、ふともものあたりに引きずったような傷が出来ていました。その晩はとにかく傷薬を塗って、寝たんですが、朝、目を覚ますとズキズキして、腫れてきていたので、近くにある観光客が良く行くBali Clinicへ行きました。一目見て、お医者さんは肌の炎症だと決めつけて抗生物質(塗り薬と飲み薬)を処方しました。診療代はUSD85(現時点で8600円程度)でした。
抗生物質を飲み始めたものの、脚の痛みはドンドン増すばかり。最終的にはLombok行きを取り消して、ジャカルタに戻らなくてはいけない友人とも別れてBROS病院の待合室に行くことにしました。この時点では足を引きずって歩く羽目に…
運よく20分程の待ち時間でオフィスに通され、最初に診て下さった一般のお医者さんは自分の手には負えないからと病院内の皮膚科の先生に連絡をとってくれました。皮膚科の専門医の先生は丁寧に傷を見て、恐らくは海で何かにかすった(クラゲ?)せいで起きた重度のアレルギー反応でしょう、と言って的確な治療を施してくれ、炎症では無い事を確認/説明し、何か変化があれば連絡するように自分のメルアドまで渡してくれ、私が落ち着くまで30分程の時間をかけてくれました。シンガポールに戻ってからもメールで様子を確認する連絡をくれたりと、しっかりしたケアを受けられました。治療代はBali Clinicと同じでUSD85(現時点で8600円程度)でした。シンガポールに戻ってからチェックアップの為に行った病院の先生もBROS病院の先生は的確に処理してくれていたし、薬もしっかりとしたものを出してくれたみたいで、良かったね、と言ってくれました。(ちなみにどこから見ても炎症ではないでしょう、とも仰いました)Bali Clinicは多くのホテルに隣接している為、手軽に行けるのですが、ケアのクオリティを考えるとBROS病院に行かれた方がいいと思います。私達の場合はそれ程重度な症状ではなかったのですが、もし必要なら無理に治療をせずに、出国手続きまでやってくれると私は感じました。ただデンパサールの渋滞は酷い事も多いので、時間がかかる事もあるのは確かです。

***ちなみにバリでタクシーに乗る場合はBlue Birdタクシーに乗るのが安全です。ただ、偽Blue Bird Taxiも出回っているようなのでお気を付け下さい。